#60 – York Creek Falls

#60 – York Creek Falls

July 14, 2018 – After seeing the recognized Castle Falls and discovering the Database’s Castle Falls (see previous post http://albertawaterfallchasers.com/2018/08/10/59-castle-falls/), we next aimed for Byron Creek Falls.  Unfortunately we missed the turn so proceeded to our next target – York Creek Falls.

As for directions, I’ll describe from the intersection of Hwy 3 (Crowsnest Hwy) and Hwy 507 (between Lundbreck and Burmis).  Here is an overview…

So you go past Burmis, past Bellevue, past the Frank Slide and Frank.  Here’s a closeup of when you get off of Hwy 3…

That end location is right at York Creek.  There may be some debate on the best way to access the Falls, but this was the only way we could figure out from the limited information we had.  Here was a closeup of the area I had done up before going…

As you can see, from the bridge would be about a 500m hike; from the weird side road would be 307m; and from the end of 108 St. would be about 200m.  The bridge was the longest of those options, but it looked like 108 St. was a personal driveway (is that even possible?) so we decided not to venture that way.  Even at the creek itself it was gated, although it looked like crown land (I could be wrong – would be best to verify somehow)…

Usually the rule of thumb is if you stay within a watershed’s high bank you’re not trespassing regardless, so we abided by that and hoped for the best.

It was a nice looking creek surrounded by flowers…

Although upon closer inspection, it was pretty piddly…

After the seemingly 4-foot waterfall of both Castle Falls, we needed a nice tall majestic waterfall to boost our spirits.  Was there any chance a tiny creek barely capable of holding a fish could produce something worthy of risking our lives in the wild?  We doubted it, but onwards we went.

It wasn’t long before bugs started eating us alive.  We tried covering our skin and putting on bug spray but they were relentless!  The next obstacle was keeping our feet dry.  After I soaked my pants shoes and socks at the last waterfall, I had enough of being in the water for one day.  The high banks became cliffs though and began forcing us to cross the creek.  Luckily we found some natural bridges…

With a little balancing, Operation Dry Feet complete!

Of course after one more bend we ran into a section without a nice fallen log…

We tried hopping from rock to rock, but it didn’t take long before those slippery suckers threw us in the drink.  As we always seem to, we once again learned that dry feet and waterfall chasing just don’t mix 😉

Once we crossed that section we ran into something very unlikely – a tourism sign!

I don’t know where the official trailhead for this tourist trail began, but looks like this was definitely a regular tourist spot at one point.  Perhaps it was used years ago and now landowners purchased the lots, hiding this piece of Alberta forever?  It was a mystery to us that we may never solve, but gave us hope that there may actually be a waterfall somewhere ahead.  As always, with unconfirmed coordinates it’s a possibility that there isn’t even one!

Shortly after, we stumbled across something we definitely didn’t expect – a waterfall over 4 feet tall that was somehow wider and bigger than this little creek would have ever guessed held!

We went in for a closer look…

Sure enough we found it, York Creek Falls!  Definitely the surprise waterfall of the trip!  How does something like this exist in the middle of nowhere along such a small creek?

Here’s a quick video (sorry tried jumbling 3 vids together but didn’t work)…

It was definitely a sight for sore eyes and ended up being one of our favourites.  Then came the trek back to the truck; we really have to get on board with where the tourist trail goes!

Luckily Dana’s a trooper!  It wasn’t long though before we were back in flower meadow…

And then our culvert parking spot…

And so concluded our 60th waterfall of Alberta together, York Creek Falls!

Stay tuned for the next waterfall that day – Star Creek Falls.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *